Practicing smile lines

Every decent nail tech needs to create the perfect smile line by hand. With gel this is MUCH easier but polish…you need to be quick!

So I need lots of practice and this was my first one last night. Never done ‘french’ before as it was never my gig.

smile

and a photo I took for my emerging nail biz:

ikinaildesign

Kimono and nails – had to happen!

I am going to invest in the new Gelish ‘Under her spell’ collection once it is out too. Love dark colours!

Footwear in my SIZE

I am on a kimono buying hiatus but one thing I can NOT resist is nice footwear in my size:

These are so pretty and it is REALLY rare to see a pretty pair of azori for under £40 which would be tagged ‘posh’. I have lots of ‘trainer zouri’ which come in at around £30 but I REALLY need a plainish black pair and a purple pair. However, these were just pretty and I will have to wait until the new year to get some more zouri in the sales!

Kimono Challenge – #2 Kimono items that are most dear to me….

The challenge questions are:

1. How did you discover and get into kimono?
2. Your dearest kimono item(s).
3. Your most used kimono item(s) (not counting jubans, datejimes etc.).
4. Your least used kimono item(s).
5. Your favourite coordination(s) so far.
6. What do you like and don’t like about kimono.
7. Kimono confessions. Did you know that…
8. Your dream kitsuke items (or at least items you really really want but can’t get for whatever reason).
9. Your biggest kimono fears.
10. Your biggest kimono inspiration.
11. Your kimono collection.
12. The evolution of your kitsuke.
13. Your special kimono memory.

My Old Faithfuls

In my kimono closet I have ‘old faithfuls’ – kimono and obi that I repair and wear constantly and would feel lost without.

1. My komon kofurisode – such a cheap buy at $20 and here it is getting ready for another wear:

Kofurisode kimono

2. My pink rose cotton fukuro obi – light and easy to manipulate I wear this obi often 🙂

Synthetic Fukuro Obi

I have lots of items I love in my collection. My geisha hikizuri are very dear to me as they are prize items in my collection. However the kimono items closest to my heart are ones I wear a lot.

Kimono Challenge #1 – How did you discover and get into kimono?

Quite a few of my kimono pals are doing this so I thought I would join in. Gives me topics to blog about 🙂

The challenge questions are:

1. How did you discover and get into kimono?
2. Your dearest kimono item(s).
3. Your most used kimono item(s) (not counting jubans, datejimes etc.).
4. Your least used kimono item(s).
5. Your favourite coordination(s) so far.
6. What do you like and don’t like about kimono.
7. Kimono confessions. Did you know that…
8. Your dream kitsuke items (or at least items you really really want but can’t get for whatever reason).
9. Your biggest kimono fears.
10. Your biggest kimono inspiration.
11. Your kimono collection.
12. The evolution of your kitsuke.
13. Your special kimono memory.

So how did I discover kimono?

Many moons ago in the cyber goth days my obsession with hello kitty hit a new high – corsetry. It was about 2001 and I was in my last year of uni. However being a student of limited funds I had taken to making my own clothes. I made a short hello kitty furisode kimono:

A hello kitty silk kimono I made while I was at uni!

It was very much in the style of a ‘costume’.However after this came a purple hello kitty one and also a powerpuff girls kimono with matching corset.

It was then a few years later around 2006 that I decided to buy a yukata and pre-tied obi. I opened the floodgates then and shortly after was married in kimono.

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I have been experimenting, improving and building my collection ever since. Kimono is now a big part of my fun and life.

Potassium Iodide and Nuclear Fears

Taking potassium iodide to prevent thyroid cancer AFTER being exposed to radiation is a must, however it is not suitable as a long term supplement (over a month). In fact kitties, its it more dangerous and not generally available in the UK in its clinical form. However, nature always comes to the rescue and seas vegetables like seaweed, kombu, kelp, wakame, and arame are naturally high in iodine and as far as we know won’t kill off your thyroid 🙂

So keep that bottle of potassium iodide for if you do get exposed to a higher than normal level of radiation and eat your sea greens for general good health. Supposed to keep you thin also…